About the Club

Mission Statement

The Carolina Bird Club is a non-profit organization that represents and supports the birding community in the Carolinas through its website, publications, meetings, workshops, trips, and partnerships, whose mission is


Join us — Join, Renew, Donate

The Carolina Bird Club, Inc., is a non-profit educational and scientific association open to anyone interested in the study and conservation of wildlife, particularly birds.

The Club meets each winter, spring, and fall at different locations in the Carolinas. Meeting sites are selected to give participants an opportunity to see many different kinds of birds. Guided field trips and informative programs are combined for an exciting weekend of meeting with people who share an enthusiasm and concern for birds.

The Club offers research grants in avian biology for undergraduate and graduate students, and scholarships for young birders.

The Club publishes two print publications (now also available online). The Chat is a quarterly ornithological journal that contains scientific articles, reports of bird records committees and bird counts, and general field notes on bird sightings. CBC Newsletter is published bimonthly and includes birding articles and information about meetings, field trips, and Club news.

The Club provides this website to all for free.

By becoming a member, you support the activities of the Club, receive reduced registration fee for meetings, can participate in bonus field trips, and receive our publications.

Join, Renew, or Donate now!


Birding Locations

Other Resources (NOT sponsored by Carolina Bird Club)



Flat Rock Field Trip Schedule and Descriptions

Friday, April 27 Saturday, April 28
All-day All-day
Trip #1Blue Ridge Parkway North 6:15
Trip #2Curtis Creek Road / Mount Mitchell / BRP 6:00
Trip #3Blue Ridge Parkway South 6:15
Trip #4Max Patch Road 6:00
Trip #5Pisgah National Forest / Davidson River to Mount Pisgah 6:30
Trip #26Blue Ridge Parkway North 6:15
Trip #27Curtis Creek Road / Mount Mitchell / BRP 6:00
Trip #28Blue Ridge Parkway South 6:15
Trip #29Max Patch Road 6:00
Trip #30Blue Wall Preserve 6:30
Half-day Morning Half-day Morning
Trip #8Green River Cove Road / Lake Adger Headwaters 6:45
Trip #9Jackson Park 7:15
Trip #10The Park at Flat Rock 7:30
Trip #11Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education 6:15
Trip #12Chimney Rock State Park / Lake Lure 7:00
Trip #13Charles D. Owen Park / Swannanoa River 6:30
Trip #14Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary 7:00
Trip #33Green River Cove Road / Lake Adger Headwaters 6:45
Trip #34Jackson Park 7:15
Trip #35Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education 6:45
Trip #36Chimney Rock State Park / Lake Lure 7:00
Trip #37Big Hungry River 7:15
Trip #38Charles D. Owen Park / Swannanoa River 6:30
Trip #39Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary 7:00
Half-day Afternoon Half-day Afternoon
Trip #17Jackson Park 1:00
Trip #18The Park at Flat Rock 1:00
Trip #19Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education 12:45
Trip #20Brevard Hike / Bike Path Trip 12:45
Trip #21Birding Techniques for Beginning Birders at Jackson Park 1:00
Trip #22Big Hungry River 1:00
Trip #23Fletcher Park / Lake Julian 12:45
Trip #42Jackson Park 1:00
Trip #43Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education 12:45
Trip #44Birding Techniques for Beginning Birders at Jackson Park 1:00
Trip #45Charles D. Owen Park / Swannanoa River 12:45
Trip #46Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary 12:45
Trip #47Big Hungry River 1:00
Trip #48Fletcher Park / Lake Julian 1:00

Flat Rock Meeting Field Trip Descriptions

Trip 1 (April 27) & Trip 26 (April 28): Blue Ridge Parkway North—ALL DAY

This is a great trip for a wide variety of low and high elevation breeding woodland species of the Southern Appalachians. The trip begins at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway north of Asheville and continues north to Mount Mitchell. Along the way a wide variety of warblers occur including Black-and-white, Hooded, Cerulean, Worm-eating, Ovenbird, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, Blackburnian and Chestnut-sided as well as Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Veery, Red-eyed, Blue-headed, and Yellow-throated Vireo and Eastern Wood Pewee. In the Mount Mitchell area look for Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Brown Creeper, and possibly Pine Siskin and Red Crossbill. Time permitting the trip will continue down Curtis Creek Rd for Louisiana Waterthrush, Swainson's Warbler, and Acadian Flycatcher.
Restrooms: At Mount MitchellWalking: Mainly along overlooks
Distance: Approx. 100 miles complete loop distance (28 miles to Folk Art Center) Driving directions
Cell phone service is weak to unavailable at times.

Trip 2 (April 27) & Trip 27 (April 28): Curtis Creek Road/Mount Mitchell/BRP—ALL DAY

This is basically the reverse of the Blue Ridge Parkway North trip and all of the same species should be found. It will start at the lower end of Curtis Creek Rd and continue up to the parkway to Mount Mitchell, then south on the BRP to the Asheville exit.
Restrooms: At Curtis Creek Campground and at Mount MitchellWalking: Easy to moderate
Distance: Approx. 100 miles complete loop distance (approx. 55 miles to Curtis Creek Rd) Driving directions
Cell phone service is weak to unavailable at times.

Trip 3 (April 27) & Trip 28 (April 28): Blue Ridge Parkway South—ALL DAY

The trip will begin at the Bent Creek entrance to the Blue Ridge Parkway and head south to Mount Pisgah, Black Balsam Road, and Devil's Courthouse, thus covering both high and low elevation habitats and species. Some of the many expected species include Canada, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, Blackburnian, and Chestnut-sided Warbler, Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Veery, Least Flycatcher, and possibly Red Crossbill, Peregrine Falcon and Ruffed Grouse as well as other migrants just passing through.
Restrooms: At Pisgah campground and at Graveyard FieldsWalking: Easy to moderate
Distance: 18.8 miles to parkway entrance plus 29 miles to Devil's Courthouse. Return trip will depend on route chosen. Driving directions
Cell phone service is weak to unavailable at times.

Trip 4 (April 27) & Trip 29 (April28): Max Patch Road—ALL DAY

If Golden-winged Warbler is your target species this trip is your best opportunity, but it is also great for many other warblers and other songbirds such as Blackburnian, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Scarlet Tanager, Veery, Least Flycatcher and many more. Time permitting on the return journey there will be a stop at Lake Junaluska to check for lingering waterfowl and shorebirds.
Restrooms: None after leaving the interstateWalking: Easy
Distance: Approx. 130 miles round trip total Driving directions
Cell phone service is weak to unavailable at times.

Trip 5 (April 27): Pisgah National Forest/Davidson River to Mount Pisgah—ALL DAY

From the entrance to the forest to Mount Pisgah the elevation change is about 2800 feet and the increasing elevation along the route brings changes in forest habitat and avian species. Through the lower parts of the forest expect Ovenbird, Louisiana Waterthrush, American Redstart, Black-and-white, Hooded, Yellow-throated, and Swainson's Warbler as well as Wood Thrush and Red-eyed Vireo. Continuing into higher elevations you will begin to encounter Black-throated Blue, Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided, and Canada Warbler as well as Blue-headed Vireo, Veery and Rose-breasted Grosbeak. At the Mount Pisgah campground there is a good chance of adding Least Flycatcher and possibly Red Crossbill as well as other migrants passing through to more northern breeding areas.
Restrooms: Several along the wayWalking: Easy to moderate
Distance: Approx. 90 miles round trip to Mt. Pisgah and back via Pisgah NF (26 miles to Forest entrance) Driving directions
Cell phone service is weak to unavailable at times.

Trip 8 (April 27) & Trip 33 (April 28): Green River Cove Road/Lake Adger Headwaters—HALF DAY

This is a great area for species commonly found along the Blue Ridge Escarpment including Louisiana Waterthrush, Swainson's, Kentucky, Worm-eating, Yellow-throated, and Prairie Warbler, Yellow-breasted Chat, Yellow-throated Vireo, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and White-eyed Vireo. At Lake Adger in recent years Prothonotary Warblers have been regularly found. This trip will require doubling up in vehicles are some stops have very limited parking.
Restrooms: NoneWalking: Easy
Distance: Approx. 45 miles round trip to Lake Adger via Green River Cove Rd. (approx. 12 miles to Green River Cove Rd.) Driving directions

Trips 9 & 17 (April 27) and Trips 34 & 42 (April 28): Jackson Park—HALF DAY

This 212-acre park in downtown Hendersonville has a nice mix of woodlands, wetlands and fields and can be a very good spot to find a nice variety of migrating songbirds. Birds are relatively easy to see here as well as they are often close to the trail. The various trails are easy and often paved.
Restrooms: YesWalking: Easy
Distance: Approx. 8 miles round trip Driving directions

Trip 10 (April 27) & Trip 18 (April 28): The Park at Flat Rock—HALF DAY

This park was only established 3 years ago, but is already very popular for walking, jogging, and birding. It is a 66-acre park with a one and a half mile trail going around the edge as well as several other trails that wind around wetlands, ponds, and wooded areas. Expect to find Yellow, Pine, and Yellow-throated Warbler, American Redstart, Eastern Kingbird, Orchard Oriole, swallows, woodpeckers, sparrows and possibly other migrating songbirds.
Restrooms: YesWalking: Easy
Distance: Approx. 4.5 miles round trip Driving directions

Trips 11& 19 (April 27) and Trips 35 & 43 (April 28): Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education—HALF DAY

Located in the Pisgah National Forest, the center is adjacent to the Davidson River Fish Hatchery and includes a large open area and woodland and streamside trails. Typical species found along the trails include Ovenbird, Northern Parula, Louisiana Waterthrush, Hooded, Swainson's, Black-throated Green, Worm-eating, and Black-and-white Warbler, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Scarlet Tanager, Blue-headed and Red-eyed Vireo, and Acadian Flycatcher. In the open area around the fish hatchery expect a variety of sparrows, swallows, and other species.
Restrooms: At the centerWalking: Easy to moderate
Distance: Approx. 66 miles round trip Driving directions
Cell phone service is weak to unavailable at times.

Trip 12 (April 27) & Trip 36 (April 28): Chimney Rock State Park/Lake Lure—HALF DAY

The stunning views alone make this trip a winner, but the park is also home to many wonderful birds and wildflowers. Breeding species include Worm-eating, Swainson's, Black-throated Green, Black-and-white, and Hooded Warbler, Blue-headed and Red-eyed Vireo, Acadian Flycatcher, Peregrine Falcon and Broad-winged Hawk and you may also find a variety of migrants heading farther north. At Lake Lure you will likely add Yellow and Yellow-throated Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, swallows, sparrows, and possibly lingering waterfowl. The entrance fee to the park is $15/person, which is not included in the CBC meeting registration, so please have the exact amount ready.
Restrooms: Both at the park and at Lake LureWalking: Easy to moderate
Distance: Approx. 40 miles round trip total (approx. 18.5 miles to Chimney Rock SP) Driving directions

Trip 13 (April 27) and Trips 38 & 45 (April 28): Charles D. Owen Park/Swannanoa River—HALF DAY

This county park is a popular spot for local birders. Both Orchard and Baltimore Oriole as well as Warbling and Yellow-throated Vireo nest along the river and/or the tree lined lake. Continuing the walk from the park to the farm fields at neighboring Warren Wilson College birders frequently encounter shrub edge and open field birds such as Yellow-breasted Chat, Northern Bobwhite, and a variety of sparrows including Grasshopper, Field, Song, and possibly some late departing Swamp, Savannah, White-crowned, and White-throated.
Restrooms: At Owen ParkWalking: Easy
Distance: 72 miles round-trip Driving directions

Trip 14 (April 27) and Trips 39 & 46 (April 28): Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary—HALF DAY

This 10-acre tract in Asheville is managed by the Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society. It consists of mixed hardwood and pine, along with early successional habitat, and includes a wetland that abuts Beaver Lake. It is often an excellent spot for migrating songbirds such as Blue-winged Warbler and Northern Waterthrush, but is also home to many breeding species such as Northern Rough-winged, Tree and Barn Swallow, Green Heron, Yellow Warbler, American Redstart, and Orchard and Baltimore Oriole. Also look for lingering waterfowl on Beaver Lake.
Restrooms: Nearby, but not at the sanctuaryWalking: Easy
Distance: 58 miles round trip Driving directions

Trip 20 (April 27): Brevard Hike/Bike Path—HALF DAY

This greenway has expanded greatly in recent years and is now six miles long and begins at the entrance to the Pisgah National Forest and continues through the outskirts of Brevard. It includes forested area along the Davidson River down through wetlands, open areas, and shrub. Species found include those typical of mountain valleys such as White-eyed and Red-eyed Vireo, American Redstart, Northern Parula, Orchard Oriole, Eastern Kingbird, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher and a variety of woodpeckers, swallows, sparrows, mimic thrushes and others. The trails are wide, flat, and mostly paved.
Restrooms: NearbyWalking: Easy
Distance: Approx. 52 miles round trip Driving directions

Trip 21 (April 27) & Trip 44 (April 28): Birding Techniques for Beginners at Jackson Park—HALF DAY

This trip will dedicate a large amount of time to teaching various birding techniques including: locating birds, basic vocal and visual identification tips, group birder etiquette, and other useful birding tips. The trip is designed for any beginning to intermediate birder looking to enhance their birding skills in the setting of Jackson Park, a mixed habitat birding location that often attracts many migrant species in spring and fall. Beyond the development of these basic birding techniques and skills, participants will also be able to hone these skills while in the field looking at live birds. This trip will take a slower approach with time spent focusing on techniques and field marks rather than a complete species inventory of everything at the park.
Restrooms: YesWalking: Easy
Distance: Approx. 8 miles round trip Driving directions

Trip 22 (April 27) and Trips 37 & 47 (April 28): Big Hungry River—HALF DAY

Owned by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission and a dedicated state Nature Preserve, this deep tributary to the Green River Gorge along the Blue Ridge Escarpment offers White Pine, Carolina Hemlock, and oak/heath habitats. Birding will be along the roads. Expected birds include Red-eyed, Blue-headed, and Yellow-throated Vireo, Red-headed Woodpecker, Blue Grosbeak, Scarlet Tanager, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and many more. Recent burns in the area opened the area to more than just forest birds, so expect a nice variety.
Restrooms: NoWalking: Easy
Distance: Approx. 10 miles round trip Driving directions

Trip 23 (April 27) & Trip 48 (April 28): Fletcher Park/Lake Julian—HALF DAY

This park alongside Cane Creek in Fletcher has easy trails along the tree-lined creek and through open, grassy areas where lingering winter birds as well as newly arriving migrants can congregate. Check for Yellow Warbler, Orchard and Baltimore Oriole, possibly Warbling Vireo, and possibly an early arriving Willow Flycatcher along the river and in the marshy areas and White-crowned and Savannah Sparrows in the shrubby and open areas. At nearby Lake Julian scan the lake for late-departing waterfowl as well as the trees in the park for warblers and vireos.
Restrooms: Yes, at both locationsWalking: Easy
Distance: Approx. 24 miles round trip Driving directions

Trip 30 (April 28): Blue Wall Preserve—ALL DAY

The Nature Conservancy site on Hogback Mountain contains a variety of habitats including hemlock/rhododendron thickets, ponds, old field pines, rushing streams, and 100-year old cove hardwood and oak/hickory forest. You may see a variety of birds including Wood Duck, woodpeckers, nuthatches, flycatchers, thrushes, abundant warblers, Scarlet Tanager and many others. A segment of SC's Palmetto Trail, the preserve also offers wildflowers and blooming shrubs.
Restrooms: NoWalking: Easy to moderate
Distance: 21 miles one way Driving directions

Spring Meeting Notes