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The Carolina Bird Club is a non-profit organization that represents and supports the birding community in the Carolinas through its website, publications, meetings, workshops, trips, and partnerships, whose mission is


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The Carolina Bird Club, Inc., is a non-profit educational and scientific association open to anyone interested in the study and conservation of wildlife, particularly birds.

The Club meets each winter, spring, and fall at different locations in the Carolinas. Meeting sites are selected to give participants an opportunity to see many different kinds of birds. Guided field trips and informative programs are combined for an exciting weekend of meeting with people who share an enthusiasm and concern for birds.

The Club offers research grants in avian biology for undergraduate and graduate students, and scholarships for young birders.

The Club publishes two print publications (now also available online). The Chat is a quarterly ornithological journal that contains scientific articles, reports of bird records committees and bird counts, and general field notes on bird sightings. CBC Newsletter is published bimonthly and includes birding articles and information about meetings, field trips, and Club news.

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By becoming a member, you support the activities of the Club, receive reduced registration fee for meetings, can participate in bonus field trips, and receive our publications.

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Briefs for the Files


Bird Records Committee reports

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Bird Records Committees


Briefs for the Files

Southern, Josh. 2018. Briefs for the files. Chat 82:84–94 (All dates Spring 2018, unless otherwise noted)
Trumpeter Swan: Two photographed on Lake Betz, Wake Co, NC, during the late afternoon of 19 Apr (George Capaz, Sahas Panda) didn't stick around for long. In direct contrast, a first-winter bird on Ocracoke Island, Hyde Co, NC, was seen and photographed by many over the course of two months, 5 Mar through 2 May (Peter Vankevich, m. obs.).

Southern, Josh. 2017. Briefs for the files. Chat 81:38–59 (All dates Winter 2016-2017, unless otherwise noted)
Trumpeter Swan: In the Pungo Unit of Pocosin Lakes NWR, Washington Co, NC, after one was first seen and heard 10 Dec (Jeff Beane, Ed Corey, et al.), two were seen there 23 Dec (Ricky Davis), a high count of three was made 14 Jan (Lucas Bobay, et al.), and at least one remained through 11 Feb (Phil Doerr, et al.). Pending review by the NC BRC was the report of a sub-adult Trumpeter Swan on the French Broad River near Alexander, Buncombe Co, NC, 25 Dec (Jay Wherley) through 27 Mar (Greg Massey). If accepted, it would be the first record of this species in the mountain region.

Southern, Josh. 2016. Briefs for the files. Chat 80:72–96 (All dates Winter 2015–2016, unless otherwise noted)
Trumpeter Swan: Two were seen at Mattamuskeet NWR, Hyde Co, NC, 20 Dec (Karen Lebing, Keith Ramos) into early January (m. obs.), with one remaining until 9 Jan (Mandy & Phil Cumming).

Southern, Josh. 2015. Briefs for the files. Chat 79:87–108 (All dates Winter 2014–2015, unless otherwise noted)
Trumpeter Swan: Two were seen in the Pungo Unit of Pocosin Lakes NWR, Hyde Co, NC, in January—an adult photographed in the company of Tundra Swans, 4 Jan (Keith Ramos) and an immature bird seen 11 Jan (Derb Carter, Harry LeGrand, Jeff Pippen). There are only two previous accepted records of this species in NC.

Southern, Josh. 2014. Briefs for the files. Chat 78:57–80 (All dates Winter 2013–2014, unless otherwise noted)
Trumpeter Swan: There were two reports of Trumpeter Swans in North Carolina this winter?an immature individual photographed on Jordan Lake, Chatham Co, NC, from Ebenezer Point, 19 Dec (Luis Suau), though never relocated; and one seen in flight and heard calling in the Pungo Unit of Pocosin Lakes NWR, border of Hyde Co and Washington Co, NC, 7 Feb (Derb Carter) where, according to refuge staff, the swan had been present for several weeks. At time of publication, the Jordan Lake sighting was accepted by the Bird Records Committee (BRC), providing NC with its second definitive record, and the Pungo Unit sighting was pending review.

Southern, Josh. 2009. Briefs for the files. Chat 73:50–76 (All dates Winter 2008–2009, unless otherwise noted)
Trumpeter Swan: A group of four birds, three adults and one immature, was reported on a small pond on private property in Nash Co, NC, 20 Feb (Matthew Odress, fide Harry LeGrand) and reportedly had been present for "about the last two weeks." In the following days, multiple birders observed and photographed these birds, which remained in the area through the end of the period (fide Ricky Davis). Though the birds showed no physical signs of captivity such as bands or clipped wings, they were reportedly tame enough to be hand-fed. If accepted by the NC Bird Records Committee, this sighting will provide the second state record.

Bird Records Committee reports

Campbell, Susan, et. al.. 2018. 2017 Report of the North Carolina Bird Records Committee. Chat 82:56–58
Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator): Accepted as valid. (17-02). Two written descriptions (Simon Thompson and John Koon) as well as photos were submitted of a bird on the French Broad River (Buncombe) in mid-February 2017. The committee voted unanimously to accept all of the material. This record is the eighth for NC and the first for the mountains.

Piephoff, Taylor. 2016. 2015 Report of the North Carolina Bird Records Committee. Chat 80:13–17
Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator): Accepted as valid. (15-01). The North Carolina Bird Records Committee (NCBRC) reviewed a written report by Harry LeGrand of an individual of this species at Pungo Refuge 11 January 2015. The report was unanimously accepted. This report represents the third record for the state and the second accepted record for the Coastal region (LeGrand et al. 2015).

Piephoff, Taylor. 2016. 2015 Report of the North Carolina Bird Records Committee. Chat 80:13–17
Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator): Accepted as valid. (15-10). A photo of a bird from Pungo refuge taken by Keith Ramos on 4 January 2015 was reviewed by the NCBRC and was unanimously accepted. This represents the fourth record for the state and the third from the Coastal region.

Tove, Michael, Chair. 2014. 2013 Annual Report of the North Carolina Bird Records Committee. Chat 78:8–13
Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator): Accepted as valid. (13–18). A single immature bird was seen and photographed by Luis J. Suau on Jordan Lake, Chatham County on 19 December 2013. Based on the photographs, the NCBRC accepted the report. Eight members voted AV (Accept as Valid) and one voted QO (Questionable Origin). While the species is already on the Definitive List, this sighting constitutes the first Piedmont record and the westernmost known occurrence of the two accepted records for the species from the state.

LeGrand, Harry E., Jr., Chair. 2010. 2009 Annual Report of the North Carolina Bird Records Committee. Chat 74:1–5
Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator): Unaccepted Origin. An apparent family group of four birds—three adults and one immature—was seen at a small pond in southern Nash County on 21–22 February 2009 by Ricky Davis, Jeff Pippen, Clyde Sorenson, Harry LeGrand, and several other observers. The birds had been present for at least two weeks prior to this date, according to Matthew Ordess. Though the photos taken by Davis were accepted to this species, the fact that the birds were extremely tame led the Committee to a voting verdict of Questionable Origin. The species is already on the Official List, based on acceptance of photos and provenance of four birds banded at Pungo refuge in February 2004.

LeGrand, Harry E., Jr., Chair. 2005. 2004 Annual Report of the North Carolina Bird Records Committee. Chat 69:29–34
Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator): Accepted as valid. A group of four Trumpeter Swans was banded on 25 February 2004 at the Pungo unit of Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff. Joy Greenwood photographed one hand-held individual in comparison with a hand-held Tundra Swan (C. columbianus). The Committee accepted the photo, and also written material from John Wright, who saw the birds with Derb Carter and Ricky Davis on 28 February. This is a first record for the state, and acceptance of photos places the species on the Official List. The Committee reviewed many websites and e-mail correspondences regarding re-introduced populations in the East and Midwest. The general feeling was that the birds were probably not vagrants from the natural range in the Far West but rather from populations in the Great Lakes region where states in that area consider the birds to be established and "countable".

Glover, Lex, Chair. 2002. 2000–2001 Report of the South Carolina Bird Records Committee. Chat 66:115–118
Trumpeter Swan: Accepted as valid. The second report of a Trumpeter Swan from South Carolina, seen in Charleston Harbor and reported by John Cottingham, was accepted with questionable origin by the Committee. This was the first report of a Trumpeter Swan to be accepted by the Committee, placing the species on the state's Provisional II List. The widespread re-introduction of this majestic bird in the mid-West and the continued presence of the species in waterfowl collections in the state prompted the Committee to vote for the possibility of a human-assisted origin for this bird.